Antique Jewels

Solar Jewellry has this vintage Miriam Haskell necklace for sale for about $325. I love the combination of soft colors from the pearls to the jade like beads. And the pendendant just makes me want to smile and whisper to the birds. What a beautiful piece of art to be worn and admired.

I am in love with jewelry from the early 1900’s. There is something in them that speaks to my heart and makes it skip a beat.

Art Nouveau era jewelry designer Miriam Haskell is one I’ve learned about recently. Her pieces evoked nature in their subjects and construction. Around 1924, Haskell began making jewelry commercially. Her creations included unique flowers, animals, and other organic materials.

Later on, Frank Hess joined Haskell’s company as lead artistic designer. Hess was known for specializing in new and technically complex production techniques which would allowed their vision for the jewelry to materialize.

Miriam Haskell jewelry is best known for it’s detailing and asymmetry. All of which takes time and raises the cost of each piece dramatically. The finest of quaility could be seen in her designsa as well. With elaborate filigree and careful wiring, which are all handmade and then transformed into many new and unique designs. The filgiree would have electroplated goldtone metal in antique gold finish.

Haskell’s beads and crystals came mostly from Italy and France, as well as the Czech Republic. But during WWI, many of her pieces were closer to home (USA) and included plastics for the first time.

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1 Comment »

  1. Miriam Haskell jewelry isn’t considered Art Nouveau at all as the Art Nouveau movement was over by the time she started her line. Although definitely influenced by natural subjects, most pieces that we think of as being characteristic of Miriam Haskell are Mid-Century. The company continues to operate today out of their New York studio and the piece that is pictured here is a more recent piece. The attention to detail and craftsmanship makes it highly collected today.

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